Ted Harris Cues

December 17, 2012
By

Ted Harris cues
A Business in Repair
by Freddie Agnir photos courtesy of Raymond Linares

Quite often, the start for a budding cue maker is in cue repair. Repeated repair business then often leads to cue building. However, when a cue maker establishes himself as a builder of cues, normally the repair business becomes secondary.

ted harris cues  Ted Harris Cues

Quite often, the start for a budding cue maker is in cue repair. Repeated repair business then often leads to cue building. However, when a cue maker establishes himself as a builder of cues, normally the repair business becomes secondary.

Ted Harris, though he builds world-class cues for players, has long been primarily known as one of the elite cue repairmen in the U.S. and one of the very few who travels to tournament venues. So when tournaments across the country began to dwindle, so, too, did his business, which then found itself in dire need of repair as well. However, thanks to his partnership with pool player and long-time friend Danny Green, Harris has bounced back, putting his cue business back on the map.

Harris fell in love with pool as a young adult while living in Florida with his father, unfortunately spelling doom to his collegiate career. Bitten deeply by the pool bug, Ted took moved to Ocean City, MD, near his mother and took a job in a poolroom. The room was full of action and management allowed Ted to partake.

On the road to becoming one of the better players in the area, Ted also learned all that he could about the pool industry, including setting up tables and replacing cue tips. Since no cue repairmen worked in his im- mediate area, he would often take cues to Tim Scruggs in Baltimore. While waiting for Tim to do the repairs, Harris would be in action at the local pool hall. However, after a disagreement with Scruggs, Ted Harris decided that he would learn how to do the repairs himself.

Ted purchased a cue lathe from famed cue maker Leonard Bludworth, one of the very few at the time who would do any kind of traveling for cue repair. In addition, most considered Bludworth the best repairman in the country. In a recurring theme, Harris had a disagreement with Bludworth, resulting in Ted vowing to become a cue repair expert who would end up taking up all of Bludworth’s work. “And that’s exactly what happened,” joked Harris. Today Harris remains friends with both Scruggs and Bludworth.

The Road to Repair
After a year of saving his money and collecting enough equipment, Ted Harris took his repair work on the road. Armed with his intrepid perso- na yet lacking a long-term plan, Harris traveled across the country to Reno, NV, in 1991 for the Sands Regency 9-ball event. He hoped to jump start his traveling cue repair business, get into action, and make a little money. The

I was fearless! I would work on any cue no matter how much it was worth.

event already had a cue mechanic, but the event organizers allowed Ted to set up shop as well. He had hoped to make maybe $200 a day, but the successful event earned him over $10,000!
During a time when a player needed to either send their cues to a cue builder to get even the most basic tip change or learn to do it himself, Harris took his repair work from tournament to tournament. He became the most p Read more ...

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